Monthly Archives: November 2016

Styles Are Continuously Changing

I was recently looking through some screenshots of apps from earlier versions of iOS. It had me thinking about where design is headed over the next five to 10 years, why we continue to iterate on style, and whether design is really getting better or simply changing in a long-term cycle for the sake of change. Is design progressive or cyclical?

The first point to consider is what style is, and why it continues to change.

In the case of digital design, there is a constant desire to see and create new styles. I’d liken it to the iPhone, for example. The style of the design is difficult to fault, yet we constantly crave a radical redesign at every year’s keynote event. The style might be different but often it’s very difficult to argue it is in fact better. The iPhone 6/7 might look different compared to the 5, but does it grip in your hand as well? Does it rest on the table flat? It’s a classic case of constant desire for change that does not always yield a better product. The same concept can be applied to digital design. We love seeing new things, experiencing new things, and design is no different.

Creatives are differentiating styles in order to maintain a unique selling point for services. Again, it’s not changing styles because they are better and help the user — it’s change as a byproduct of boredom, competition and the requirement to stand out.

José Espinosa of MIT wrote an interesting essay on a similar topic but around the concept of fashion. It’s hard not to see crossovers between the industries. This was one of the most interesting sections:

“As time passes, more and more people adapt the new style, but unfortunately not all of them fully understand its underlying principles but nevertheless follow the external changes in the fashion. Thus, the new style has become mainstreamed. The pioneers get frustrated because their style does not serve as a differentiation signal anymore.

Reality and Web Design

The 2D web could become immersive, interactive and tangible. Imagine Wikipedia as an extensive multimedia library. Instead of reading about the Egyptian pyramids, you could wander around them, explore the inside of the pyramids, view the texture of blocks used to build it or solve a puzzle to gain access to the pharaoh’s tomb. You could even have a virtual guide accompanying you, narrating the history of the pyramids and answering questions. And all this while being accompanied by distinct ambient sound effects and sounds.

Not impressed?

What about surfing Amazon, searching for the ultimate wedding dress? You could try them on, see yourself from a 3D perspective. You could create multiple avatars to compare several dresses to could choose the one that fits and have it delivered in one day. Visit a virtual car dealer, test-drive the car, select options, tweak the seat position, see if it suits you and … summon it (Hello Tesla!). Science fiction? Twenty years ago, shopping on the internet was science fiction. Twenty years ago, the idea that you could watch the Olympic Games on your VR headset was equivalent to Star Trek’s holodeck.

The hardware to achieve this, while still in infancy, is here. HD cameras, 360-degree cameras, fast graphical processors and VR handsets are the pathfinders to a new era. Expensive, bulky and sluggish at this time, as the rate of adoption will rise, the hardware will get cheaper, smaller and faster.

Illustrator vs Sketch

The ever-expanding world of design can be tough to comprehend as a newcomer. With so many tools and techniques available it’s hard to know where to start.

Three of the most widely used design programs are Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and the newer Sketch by Bohemian Coding.

In this guide I want to compare these three titans of industry to see how they stack up for common design tasks. All three programs are incredible, but they each have their own strengths and weaknesses for certain creative tasks. One you know which tool best fits the task at hand you’ll have a much easier time learning and mastering digital design work.

 

UI Design

Interface design usually relates to websites and mobile apps, but can also include game UIs or any digital screen that takes user interaction.

For years Photoshop was the #1 choice for UI design. In PS you can build vector icons and textured backgrounds to mix into one common layout. But Photoshop was always intended to be a photo editing suite, and while Fireworks was better it has since been discontinued by Adobe.

This is where Sketch comes into play. The very first release of Sketch App was in late 2010. It has since grown massively with a large community fostering learning materials and entire websites dedicated to free Sketch resources.

When it comes to UI design Sketch is currently the king. This program’s purpose was to be a UI design suite for web & mobile. Patterns, textures, and vectors all intermingle with each other much easier than in Photoshop.

The only downside is that Windows users cannot run Sketch because it’s OS X exclusive.