Monthly Archives: October 2016

The Uncomfortable Side of Design

In March 2016, Twitter celebrated its 10th birthday. It was a day filled with pride for the company and many of its followers. In order to make the day amazing for its users, Twitter released a delightful like/heart button animation.

It was awesome, but as soon as the day was over the animation was gone too. Some people don’t care and some didn’t even notice but those who did were left with a void. I’m not exaggerating; hear me out. The heart explodes with confetti, it bounces and is jolly and colorful. Overall, it makes the mundane tasks of liking or favoriting a tweet much more interesting and fun. When you take that away it’s a little sad and underwhelming.

Since it’s birthday, Twitter did update the heart animation to be a little but more than just a color change but it’s still nothing compared to the confetti explosion. All in all, this is a silly complaint yet people are disappointed enough to blog about it on The Next Web. It actually bummed people out, which is rude and awful.

 

Taking a Step Back

Let’s also talk about the aspect of hearts versus stars. If you recall, late 2015, Twitter changed its UI from stars to hearts. “The heart is a universal symbol, it’s a much more inclusive symbol,” said Casey Newton. Check out Twitter’s gif for what the new heart UI is all about. (No, it’s not the same as the confetti explosion from their birthday.)

The decision was business oriented because Twitter was excited for increased interactivity due to the change. Again, that’s all fine and dandy but what happens when you have a negative thoughts. How is a heart at all an appropriate response for a negative remark? It’s not, it’s insensitive and unhelpful. A star is also unhelpful, for what it’s worth.

 

It’s Not Just Twitter’s Problem

I am not picking on Twitter. It happens to be a great source of examples. What if there is breaking news of a terrible incident?

Typography Cheat Sheet

Understanding type can be one of the most difficult elements of design. There’s a lot of terminology and lingo that type designers (and designers, in general) use when talking about lettering. Sometimes it can be tough to decipher it all.

If you find yourself wondering what the difference between a hook and a counter are or you still aren’t sure how a serif and a slab are different, we have you covered with this typography cheat sheet.

It describes all of the different aspects of lettering, from terminology to components to type styles and methods of typographic manipulation so you will have a better grasp on how to understand and use typography in your design projects.

Are you ready to get started? We’ve got a great infographic to help you better understand the elements of typography.

But there is a good amount of overlap, and to be a great UI/UX designer you’ll need to dip a toe into both worlds.

In this guide I want to comb over the fundamental skills that you should learn to promote yourself as a quality UI and/or UX designer. Job security is much easier when you can alternate between both roles. And it’ll be easier for you to see the big picture in any creative project.